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F1 race winner blasts modern stars and insists sport is BEHIND rival series

F1 race winner blasts modern stars and insists sport is BEHIND rival series

F1 News

F1 race winner blasts modern stars and insists sport is BEHIND rival series

F1 race winner blasts modern stars and insists sport is BEHIND rival series

Former Formula 1 driver Gerhard Berger has slammed modern day drivers and insisted that MotoGP is ahead of the series.

Since the Austrian’s 15-year F1 career ended when he retired in 1997, technology and safety standards have significantly improved to bring the chances of a fatal accident down.

But that does not mean the drivers are immune to injury while in the cockpit; Daniel Ricciardo suffered a broken wrist in a bizarre crash at Zandvoort and Lance Stroll raced at the season opener in Bahrain having broken both wrists in training just weeks prior.

There is also the issue of extreme weather conditions such as in Qatar, where the intense heat and humidity during the weekend left several drivers almost passing out and vomiting after the race.

Technology and safety improvements have limited the chances of fatal injuries in F1
But drivers like Daniel Ricciardo and Lance Stroll still sustained injuries last season
Gerhard Berger slammed modern F1 drivers and insisted MotoGP is ahead of the sport

Berger: MotoGP is ahead of F1

But Berger – who won 10 grands prix in his career – has criticised modern F1 drivers for making a big deal out of injuries and difficult conditions.

Speaking with Auto Motorsport, he claimed that the sport was behind MotoGP in the fact that more risks are taken and the riders get on with their racing if they get hurt.

“Motorcycle racing is more brutal and down-to-earth,” he said.

“By that I don't mean the technology. The whole environment is more relaxed and closer to the fans. Formula 1 is more detached in its entire attitude. Everything is subordinated to perfection, everything is calculated.

“If a driver sprains his finger, doctors and physios are there straight away, and the whole thing is a huge story. In MotoGP, a rider breaks his shoulder in the morning and, to put it bluntly, is back on his bike in the afternoon. This is how you imagine superstars who, on the one hand, control an infernal machine, but then also grit their teeth when it hurts.

“In Formula 1, the drivers complain when it's too hot like in Qatar. During my time we drove in Rio in 40 degrees and high humidity. And we also had to switch gears by hand. I don't want to say it was harder back then, but it wasn't easier either.

“Of course, there are limits to your willingness to take risks. I was on the Isle of Man last year. I left after a day. That's just too much risk, too much danger. On the other hand, Formula 1 is too far behind in this regard. MotoGP is the golden mean.”

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