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Why F1 2022 will not resemble a 'one-make' series

Why F1 2022 will not resemble a 'one-make' series

F1 News

2 comments

Why F1 2022 will not resemble a 'one-make' series

Why F1 2022 will not resemble a 'one-make' series

Alpine executive director Marcin Budkowski has eased fears F1 will look like a one-make championship when new regulations are introduced next season.

The 2022 car was launched at Silverstone last time out with radical new styling as the sport aims to promote closer, more exciting racing.

With the regulations around car design much more restrictive in order to discourage a plethora of wings and vanes from being added to the cars in the quest for added performance, worries have arisen over the sport reflecting a one-make series.

Asked if this was a concern, Budkowski replied: "By definition, these regulations, even if they are more restrictive, are still open to development, so we’re far from a one-make formula so far.

"Equally, one of the objectives of the FIA and Formula 1, when they conceived these regulations, is to make them more restrictive because they want closer racing, as in less differences, less potential, if you want, for differentiation between the teams.

"They also conceived them for an objective, which is easier following, so more ease of overtaking if you want and the more divergence from the initial geometry, the more the subjective is at risk, so that’s the reason why they’re more restrictive."

Like with any change of regulation in F1, the development cycle allows for larger gains at the beginning of a regulation set before gains become more incremental at the end of the cycle and Budkowski expects no different from the 2022 machinery.

"We’re still finding quite a lot of performance at this stage because it’s early on in the development phase of these cars," he added.

"It will taper down, it will be more and more difficult to find performance but at this stage, there is still quite a lot of performance to be found on these cars."

What do you think?
Neville

Colin Chapman stepped away from F1 because of the tightening rules. I'd agree with him here. F1 is now heading towards standard corporate engineering, good for "entertainment" but the death knell for designers and engineers. Designing washing machines may be the way to go.

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Neville
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Jul 2021
First Poster
Neville

Colin Chapman stepped away from F1 because of the tightening rules. I'd agree with him here. F1 is now heading towards standard corporate engineering, good for "entertainment" but the death knell for designers and engineers. Designing washing machines may be the way to go.

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Frank
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Jan 2021
Frank

When I first started following Grand Prix racing there was no doubting which car was which. You could not confuse an Alfa 158/9 with a Cooper-Bristol or a Talbot-Lago. And it was the cars themselves that were the attraction, more than the drivers. This continued through the 60's and 70's with cars as diverse as the six-wheeler Tyrrell and the instantly recognisable Lotus 72's, the Hesketh and Ferraris. Then we got those F1 video games and I have the impression that F1 is trying to become one of those to appeal to the younger generation that was brought up on them. Of course, as the old codgers die off, you will need a new audience and that's probably what Brawn and Co. are thinking about!

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