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Haas estimate $1million damage to Schumacher's car after 33g impact

Haas estimate $1million damage to Schumacher's car after 33g impact

F1 News

Haas estimate $1million damage to Schumacher's car after 33g impact

Haas estimate $1million damage to Schumacher's car after 33g impact

Haas team principal Guenther Steiner has revealed only the engine and battery pack survived Mick Schumacher's shocking qualifying crash that caused up to $1million worth of damage.

Schumacher slammed into a concrete wall at 150mph after riding the turn 10 kerb, with the impact estimated by Steiner to be 33g.

The 23-year-old German fortunately sustained no injuries, however, a decision was taken to only run one car in the race as Steiner saw no need to risk the possibility of another heavy shunt, particularly in this budget cap era.

Delivering an assessment of the damage, Steiner said: "The chassis itself doesn't seem to be broken, the side-impact structure but you can change them.

"We need to do a proper check on the chassis but not too bad, to be honest.

"The engine, I've been told by Ferrari, seems to be okay, the battery pack as well, and then all the rest is broken."

Haas suspension "talcum powder"

Asked to estimate the cost of the damage, Steiner added: "The cost is pretty high because all the suspension is gone except the front left.

"There is still something on there, the rest is just like talcum powder.

"I don't know money-wise as yet but the bodywork's gone, radiator so between half-a-million to a million [dollars] I would say."

Such a figure naturally impacts heavily on a team's budget cap, which this year is set at $140million.

Steiner has warned further incidents across the season, with another 21 grands prix remaining, will naturally have consequences on the cap.

"There is a nominal amount [to cover accidents] but in a racing team you can never stick to a budget like in a normal commercial business because you have this risk," said Steiner.

"You have your contingency but if you have two or three [incidents] like this then your contingency is used up pretty quick.

"It's not a contingency anymore, it's a loss so you just need to manage. Obviously, I hope we don't have many of them."

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