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F1 and FIA to look at IndyCar red-flag rule after Leclerc qualifying crash

F1 and FIA to look at IndyCar red-flag rule after Leclerc qualifying crash

F1 News

F1 and FIA to look at IndyCar red-flag rule after Leclerc qualifying crash

F1 and FIA to look at IndyCar red-flag rule after Leclerc qualifying crash

FIA race director Michael Masi has confirmed IndyCar's red-flag rule will be considered following Charles Leclerc's qualifying crash ahead of the Monaco Grand Prix.

After setting a time that was good enough for provisional pole, Leclerc crashed into a barrier at the swimming pool complex on his second fast lap, bringing the top-10 shoot-out to a halt with 18 seconds remaining.

At that stage, Red Bull's Max Verstappen and Valtteri Bottas in his Mercedes were threatening to go quicker but were forced to settle for second and third on the grid.

In IndyCar, article 8.3.4 of its regulations state: "If a car causes a red condition in any segment, the car’s best two timed laps of the segment shall be disallowed, the car may not continue in the segment, and the car shall not advance to the next segment."

Asked whether it is something F1 and the FIA would look into, Masi replied: “Like everything when anything arises, the FIA, Formula 1 and the teams look at everything and consider it on its merits.

"Yes, I know the IndyCar rule, which is also a rule in a number of other FIA international series and domestic championships around the world.

"We will look at it and, together with all of the key stakeholders, determine if it is suitable or not.”

Mercedes' Wolff lends his support

Mercedes team principal Toto Wolff has backed Masi, suggesting a driver could not then be questioned whether his actions were deliberate or not.

Previous high-profile incidents in Monaco saw Michael Schumacher infamously 'park' his Ferrari at Rascasse to deny Fernando Alonso pole in 2006, while Nico Rosberg locked up at Mirabeau, so denying Lewis Hamilton top spot on the grid in 2014.

Wolff said: "It is an intelligent rule that would avoid confusion.

"By any means, I don't think that Charles put it in the wall because there is just too much at stake.

"But it would be a nice little incentive to make sure all the polemic such a situation provokes is out of the question. It is not happening because no one could doubt."

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